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Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Different types of pocket

The Different types of pocket – 

     A small bag sewn into or on clothing so as to form part of it, used for carrying small articles is known as pocket. The different types of pocket are shown below - 

Patch

     A pocket that is pressed and sewn on to the exterior of a garment.

Patch

Patch with pleat

     As the patch pocket, but with a box pleat to create more space within the pocket.

Patch with pocket

Jetted

     The pocket is constructed by cutting through the garment to the required length of the finished pocket, then the edges are bound and a pocket bag attached to the back of the garment.

Jetted

Jetted with reinforcement

     As the jetted pocket, but with leather or fabric patches stitched to the edge of the pocket to strengthen the finished binding.

Jetted with reinforcement

Bound patch

     As the patch pocket, here shown gathered into a binding applied to the top edge to neaten it.

Bound patch

Shirt

     Normally a breast pocket placed on any kind of shirt but usually a work shirt. It is a patch pocket with a shaped bottom and a turned back and top-stitched welt effect at the top.

Shirt

Patch with flap

     As the patch pocket, but with a bagged out flap, the same width as the patch and stitched above the patch, to cover the opening. It is finished with a button or stud fastening.

Patch with flap

Welt

     Similar in construction to the jetted pocket in that the garment is slashed to the length of the finished pocket and a folded and bagged out piece of fabric, the width of the finished pocket, plus seam allowance, is set into the slash and stitched up at the sides. The extended flap is stitched down at the sides and covers the pocket opening.

Welt

Jetted with Zip

     As the jetted pocket, but with a zip set into the opening created by the bindings.

Jetted with Zip

Shirred Patch

     As the patch pocket but the head of the pocket is elasticized to create a more spacious pocket.

Shirred Patch

Double pocket

    This is a patch pocket that is layered to create two pockets. The zipped top is the entrance to one pocket and here the left side is the entry for the other.

Double pocket

Post box in patch

     The patch pocket and jetted pocket combined in that the entrance to the pocket is through the jet, the patch being stitch all the around.

Post box in patch

Angled flap

     A shaped flap set into the garment like an upside down welt.

Angled flap

Jetted with Tab

     As the jetted pocket, but with a tab for fastening set into the jet.

Jetted with Tab

Mechanic’s

     Normally seen on dungarees, overalls and work jeans, the mechanic’s pocket is a large patch with cut away top and tag at the bottom for hanging tools.

Mechanic’s

Utility

     Like the kangaroo pocket but with many more divisions for specific tools and instruments.

Utility

Western

     Like the angled flap, but with a bottom carving to a point, echoing the western or cowboy style of pocket.

Western

Jetted with flap

     This pocket is like the jet with tab. The flap runs the full width of the pocket and here has curved corners.

Jetted with flap

Bellows

     A patch pocket with a pleat set behind it that expands to accommodate articles placed within it. Applied to work jackets and coats.

Bellows

Patch with tab

As the patch pocket, but with an extended tab and button head for decoration only.

Patch with tab

Denim top-stitched

     A patch pocket made from denim and applied to denim jeans and other jeans-styled garments. It has the hallmark twin top-stitching.

Denim top-stitched

Rounded flap

     Like the angled flap but with curved edges.

Rounded flap

Curved jet

     As the jetted pocket but the cut in the garment is curved, not straight. This example has leather reinforcements.

Curved jet

Bucket

     A patch pocket cut with flare at the top, like a cowl neck, and applied to the external surface of the garment. It creates a draped silhouette.

Bucket

Petal

     A patch pocket that is split in two and overlapped with a curved top, to create a folded petal effect.

Petal

Kangaroo

      A wide patch pocket split into two by a stitch line.

Kangaroo

Contoured Jet with reinforcement

     As the curved jet but the opening is exaggerated to show the pocket bag, which is made in a contrast fabric. The corners are also reinforced.

Contoured Jet with reinforcement

Hidden in seam

     This pocket has the appearance of the curved jet, but is much simpler in construction. It is set into a seam, topstitched and reinforced, pocket bags are applied to the seam allowance inside the garment.

Hidden in seam

Epaulette Pocket

     This pocket is similar to the hidden in seam pocket, the seam being part of a raglan sleeve and set close to the shoulder. Consequently the pocket has the name epaulette, i.e. shoulder ornament.

Epaulette Pocket
Epaulette Pocket

Side

     This pocket is set into the side seam of the garment, similar to the hidden in seam pocket.

Side pocket
Side pocket

Curved inset

      The pocket here is constructed as a part of the front of the trouser or skirt, the back of the pocket is also part of the construction. The back of the pocket bag is an extension of that part of the garment, the front of it is effectively a facing to the front part of the garment.

Curved inset
Curved inset pocket

Slanted Inset

     As the curved inset but the shape of the pocket is that of a slant instead of a curve.

Slanted Inset
Slanted Inset

Cargo

     Similar in construction to the mechanic’s pocket but applied to the waist of jeans or dungarees. The belt passes through the top of the pocket.

Cargo
Cargo pocket

Ticket

     Introduced to carry railways tickets around 1860, the ticket pocket is frequently seen on denim jeans.

Ticket
Ticket pocket

Waist line pockets


Waist line pockets

The photographs are showing two shots of waist line pockets.
Right side pocket is closer to the Button over the Zip and the left side pocket is closer to the Button hole. Both are around 3.5 inches X 4.5 inches. 
Similar pockets are stitched inside the Hand pockets with a small inclination outside.

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About the Author :

He is Md. Abu Sayed from Naogaon, Bangladesh. He is a Textile Engineer and working as a Testing Engineer at Bureau Veritas CPS (BD) Ltd. He also Likes article writing on Textile and Clothing Technology.

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5 comments:

  1. Nice writing! I like it!! As a
    Textile engineering student I'll follow this site to know more about textile technology. Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  2. You have written a nice and informative post about different types of pocket. It will help all to know about pocket types. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi there!
    I am getting a trousers tailored, with cargo pockets. I would like to know, what is the width, height and depth of such pockets.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi...
    im waiting for the next information about fashion...thanks from Indonesia.

    ReplyDelete